Other Free Encyclopedias » Animal Life Resource » Jellyfish, Sponges, and Other Simple Animals » Entoprocts: Entoprocta - Behavior And Reproduction, Marine Colonial Entoproct (barentsia Discreta): Species Account - PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS, GEOGRAPHIC RANGE, HABITAT, DIET, ENTOPROCTS AND PEOPLE, CONSERVATION STATUS

Entoprocts: Entoprocta - Marine Colonial Entoproct (barentsia Discreta): Species Account

colony live sea deep

Physical characteristics: Marine colonial entoprocts are 0.1 to 0.2 inch (3 to 6 millimeters) long and have about 20 tentacles. The stalks are three to eight times longer than the crown and have a muscular swelling at the base. The bases are attached to a branch that connects the colony members.

Geographic range: Marine colonial entoprocts live all over the world except northern Europe.

Habitat: Marine colonial entoprocts live on rocks, stones, dock pilings, and worm tubes in shallow or deep sea water.

Diet: Marine colonial entoprocts eat drifting microscopic plant particles.

Behavior and reproduction: When disturbed, marine colonial entoprocts bend from the base, but the stalk itself does not curve. When Marine colonial entoprocts live on rocks, stones, dock pilings, and worm tubes in shallow or deep sea water. (Illustration by Emily Damstra. Reproduced by permission.) one member of the colony bends, those around it also bend. Marine colonial entoprocts bud from the branch that connects the colony members. A single colony has both male and female members. Embryos develop into larvae inside the females.


Marine colonial entoprocts and people: Marine colonial entoprocts have no known importance to people.


Conservation status: Marine colonial entoprocts are not considered threatened or endangered. ∎


FOR MORE INFORMATION

Books:

Valentine, James W. On the Origin of Phyla. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Web sites:

Badorf, Michelle, Courtney Lewis, Bridget O'Malley, Kimberly Owen, and Shelly Zimmerman. "Reclassification of Entoprocta into the Subkingdom Proterostomata." Journal of Systematic Biology. http://comenius.susqu.edu/bi/202/Journal/Vol8/number1/1zoobls.html (accessed on February 3, 2005).

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