1 minute read

Bonefishes and Relatives: Albuliformes - Physical Characteristics, Bonefishes (albula Vulpes): Species Account - GEOGRAPHIC RANGE, HABITAT, DIET, BEHAVIOR AND REPRODUCTION, BONEFISHES AND THEIR RELATIVES AND PEOPLE, CONSERVATION STATUS

Animal Life ResourceFish and Other Cold-Blooded Vertebrates

BONEFISHES (Albula vulpes): SPECIES ACCOUNT

GEOGRAPHIC RANGE

Bonefishes and their relatives live all over the world.


HABITAT

Bonefishes live in shallow tropical waters, or waters with an average annual temperature more than 68°F (20°C). Halosaurs and spiny eels live at the bottom of the ocean in water that is 3,281–9843 feet (1,000–3,000 meters) deep.


DIET

Bonefishes eat fishes and small invertebrates (in-VER-teh-brehts), or animals without backbones. Halosaurs and spiny eels eat bottom-dwelling animals, including worms; mollusks (MAH-lusks), or soft-bodied, usually hard-shelled animals such as clams; and crustaceans (krus-TAY-shuns), or water-dwelling animals without a backbone and that have jointed legs. Larger bonefishes also eat fish.


BEHAVIOR AND REPRODUCTION

Bonefishes live in small schools in sometimes extremely shallow water. They are ready to reproduce when they are about three and a half to four years old. The spawning areas of bonefishes, or the areas where they produce and release their eggs, are unknown. Bonefishes live for at least nineteen years. Spiny eel larvae (LAR-vee), or spiny eels in the early stage of development before becoming adults, can reach a length of 3.3 to 6.6 feet (1 to 2 meters).


BONEFISHES AND THEIR RELATIVES AND PEOPLE

Bonefishes are popular sport fishes. Bonefishes are not considered a food fish in Florida, and most are released when caught. Halosaurs and spiny eels are of no commercial value.


CONSERVATION STATUS

Bonefishes and their relatives are not threatened or endangered.

Additional topics