Other Free Encyclopedias » Animal Life Resource » Dinosaurs, Snakes, and Other Reptiles » Galliwasps Alligator Lizards and Relatives: Anguidae - Physical Characteristics, Diet, Behavior And Reproduction, Alligator Lizards, Galliwasps, Their Relatives, And People - GEOGRAPHIC RANGE, HABITAT

Galliwasps Alligator Lizards and Relatives: Anguidae - Texas Alligator Lizard (gerrhonotus Liocephalus): Species Account

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Physical characteristics: The Texas alligator lizard has a long tail and, unlike some other members of this family, four working legs. Its squarish scales somewhat resemble those of an alligator. Its back is reddish brown, sometimes yellowish, with crooked crossbands of white and black scales. Adults usually range from 9.8 to 15.7 inches (25 to 40 centimeters) in length, but some can be as long as 19.7 inches (50 centimeters).


Geographic range: They live from Texas in the United States to San Luis Potosí in central Mexico.


Habitat: The Texas alligator lizard often lives on rocky hillsides, preferring areas without many plants, although it does sometimes live in dry woods and shrubby areas.

When the Texas alligator lizard feels threatened, it can fill itself up with air, which may make it appear large enough that a predator will leave it alone. (Robert J. Huffman/Field Mark Publications. Reproduced by permission.)

Diet: This slow-moving species spends much of the day searching for various invertebrates, as well as small rodents or other vertebrates, it can capture and eat.


Behavior and reproduction: This species is active during the day. When it feels threatened, it can blow itself up with air, which may make it appear large enough that a predator will leave it alone. Females lay five to thirty-one eggs at least once a year, and they often remain with the eggs until they hatch.


Texas alligator lizards and people: People sometimes collect these lizards for pets.


Conservation status: The Texas alligator lizard is not listed as endangered or threatened. ∎

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Books

Badger, D. Lizards: A Natural History of Some Uncommon Creatures— Extraordinary Chameleons, Iguanas, Geckos, and More. Stillwater, MN: Voyageur Press, 2002.

Capula, Massimo. Simon and Schuster's Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of the World. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.

Grismer, L. Lee. Amphibians and Reptiles of Baja California, Including Its Pacific Islands and the Islands in the Sea of Cortés. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.

Mattison, Chris. Lizards of the World. New York, NY: Facts on File, 1989.

Savage, Jay M. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Costa Rica. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Web sites

"Alligator Lizard." Melissa Kaplan's Herp Care Collection. http://www.anapsid.org/gerrhont.html (accessed on October 20, 2004).

"Eastern Glass Lizard." Yahooligans! Animals. http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/content/animals/species/4313.html (accessed on October 20, 2004).

"Glass Lizard -Glass Snake -Legless Lizard." Melissa Kaplan's Herp Care Collection. http://www.anapsid.org/legless.html (accessed on October 20, 2004).

"Northern Alligator Lizard." Yahooligans! Animals. http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/content/animals/species/4322.html (accessed on October 20, 2004).

"Slender Glass Lizard." Iowa Herpetology. http://www.herpnet.net/Iowa-Herpetology/reptiles/lizards/glass_lizard.html (accessed on October 20, 2004).

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